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Brazilian Man Has Deportation Order Revoked

Brazilian Man Has Deportation Order Revoked

A Brazilian family have expressed their relief as Lucivaldo Araujo da Silva is released from Cloverhill Prison, Dublin, after the revocation of his deportation order.

Father of three, Lucivaldo Araujo da Silva, who was due to be deported from Ireland to Brazil just days after his daughter’s birthday, has been released following the revocation of his deportation order.

Having been arrested in early February, Mr da Silva had been threatened with a deportation order due to living in Ireland undocumented for over a decade. His partner and eldest child, Stephany, had also been informed that they, too, may be deported.

Lucivaldo Araujo da Silva (35), Danielle Martins Ribeiro, Stephany Bianka Martins Ribeiro (12), Bryan Martins Araujo (9) and Nicole Martins Ribeiro (2), back home in Athenry, Co Galway.Lucivaldo Araujo da Silva reunites with his family following his arrest in early February.
[Image: Irish Times]

“[…] they want to continue attending The Boys School and Scoil Chroi Naofa, Irish dancing, hurling and soccer for Athenry with their friends in the only home they’ve ever known.”

Yet petitions soon circulated as residents of Athenry, Galway – home to the da Silva family – campaigned against the deportation. Posted on Change.org, the petition urged the Minister for Justice, Charles Flanagan, to intervene, attesting to the fact that Mr da Silva is ‘a valued and respected member of Athenry Community’ and that ‘his three beautiful children Stephany (12), Bryan (9) and Nicole (2) were all born in Ireland and have lived here their entire lives.’

It describes how their lives have been ‘ripped apart’ and how ‘they want to continue attending The Boys School and Scoil Chroi Naofa, Irish dancing, hurling and soccer for Athenry with their friends in the only home they’ve ever known.’

The petition poignantly captures the injustice of how children, despite being born in Ireland, may still be subject to deportation.

This follows the result of a 2004 referendum to remove the automatic right to citizenship of children born in the country to non-Irish parents, which was passed by a large majority.

12-year-old Stephany told the Irish Times, “I have never stepped my foot out of here, I’ve spent my whole life here. I was born in Galway hospital. I’m a Galway girl from the fields of Athenry. I don’t want to go to Brazil.”

The petition poignantly captures the injustice of how children, despite being born in Ireland, may still be subject to deportation.

On Monday 24th February, Mr da Silva was informed that his deportation order had been frozen and was soon after released from Cloverhill Prison, Dublin.

His partner, Danielle, described it as ‘the best day of [her] life’.